renewable energy – Waterky http://waterky.org/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 05:35:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://waterky.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-16-120x120.png renewable energy – Waterky http://waterky.org/ 32 32 Three interesting facts about electricity | Editorial https://waterky.org/three-interesting-facts-about-electricity-editorial/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://waterky.org/three-interesting-facts-about-electricity-editorial/ Electricity turns darkness into light, makes hot food cold and cold food hot, washes dishes and searches the Internet. It is essential to our daily lives, so much so that we rarely think about it. But behind the scenes, interesting things are happening. Here are three interesting facts about electricity that have even some experts […]]]>






Electricity turns darkness into light, makes hot food cold and cold food hot, washes dishes and searches the Internet. It is essential to our daily lives, so much so that we rarely think about it. But behind the scenes, interesting things are happening.

Here are three interesting facts about electricity that have even some experts scratching and shaking their heads.

1. Electricity must be used or stored after it is produced.

A rechargeable battery stores electricity – more on that later. But the type of electricity you use in your home must be used after it is produced.

It’s true. Electricity generated from power plants, solar panels, wind turbines, and hydroelectric dams in the United States must be perfectly timed when you decide to cook, wash clothes, or watch television. The nation’s network of electrical generators, cables and substations is an incredibly complex network that allows electricity to flow smoothly.

A vast and complex system of apparatus controls this flow of energy in a perfectly balanced way. This is one reason why utility operators need to be strategic when adding renewable energy to the country’s energy mix – a coal or natural gas plant can ramp up or down production fast enough to respond to changes in energy demand. But solar power and wind power are more dependent on the whims of Mother Nature, which adds an extra degree of difficulty to energy management. However, advances in technology could change that.

Large-scale battery storage technology is improving rapidly, allowing large batteries to offer power utilities another way to better balance the flow and timing of electricity. Wider use of large-scale batteries could also make it easier to add solar and wind power to our grid – storing power when it’s breezy and sunny, then using it at night and in calm weather.

2. Power outage? Blame a squirrel.

Although inclement weather causes most outages, if the weather is nice and your electricity goes out, it could be caused by a squirrel.

We all know to play it safe around electricity, but squirrels don’t. They frolic and chew around transformers, substations and utility poles where they can disrupt high-voltage equipment, knocking out power for you and me.

But it’s not just squirrels. Snakes, birds and other critters can end up in dangerous places. There is no official record of wildlife-caused power outages, but estimates are as high as 20%.

Electric utilities are constantly devising new ways to keep wildlife away from hazardous electrical equipment – the resulting power interruptions are annoying to us power consumers, and always deadly to the squirrel.

3. Highways could charge electric vehicles in the future.

If the researchers were successful, electric vehicles wouldn’t need to plug in – they could charge while being driven.

“Wireless dynamic charging” projects are underway around the world. The idea is similar to the wireless chargers you can buy for your home electronics, the kind you can place near a charger rather than plugging in the smartphone or other device.

Charging cars while they are driving on the highway is of course much more ambitious. But some developers predict that within five years, in addition to today’s high-occupancy vehicle lanes for rush hour traffic in major cities, there could be sections of vehicle charging lanes .

Futurists expect electric trucks to be the most likely users of wireless charging lanes. After all, most electric cars can charge overnight in a residential garage. Dynamic wireless truck charging could allow deliveries to continue rather than having drivers sitting around and drinking coffee for the few hours it would take a conventional plug-in to get trucks back to full power.

Electricity is such a part of our daily lives that it’s easy to forget about it. But once in a while it’s good to think about all its benefits and mysteries. This awareness can help ensure that we are paying attention to safety precautions, but also, sometimes it is good to be surprised.

For more information on electricity, visit: www.svalleyec.com.

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[OPINION] We need a break…from rising oil and electricity prices https://waterky.org/opinion-we-need-a-break-from-rising-oil-and-electricity-prices/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 03:41:54 +0000 https://waterky.org/opinion-we-need-a-break-from-rising-oil-and-electricity-prices/ Get ready: a (expensive) summer is coming. Our lives for the next few months will not only be affected by election season. Diesel and gasoline prices have steadily increased every week this year. Our electricity rates are already among the highest in Asia. As if the burden on us consumers wasn’t already more than enough, […]]]>

Get ready: a (expensive) summer is coming.

Our lives for the next few months will not only be affected by election season. Diesel and gasoline prices have steadily increased every week this year. Our electricity rates are already among the highest in Asia.

As if the burden on us consumers wasn’t already more than enough, more price hikes are coming soon.

Diesel and petrol prices could rise to P12 and P9 per litre, respectively, according to industry sources. These massive increases are the result of the invasion of Ukraine by Russia, one of the world’s leading oil producers. With economic sanctions imposed by some developed countries, rates in the Philippines, a net oil importer, reacted to more expensive products on the world market.

That said, prices for gasoline, diesel and other petroleum products are already significantly higher than before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. While rates initially fell due to shutdowns and the resulting decline in demand for petroleum products, they eventually rose as the global and domestic economies recovered over the past two years. This is amplified by the weakening of the value of the peso against the dollar, another impact of the said health crisis.

Meanwhile, Meralco has already advised the public to expect further electricity rate increases in the coming months. In addition to the depreciation of the peso and the increase in fuel prices, the usual increase in energy demand during the summer months and scheduled shutdowns for maintenance of some coal-fired power plants are also cited as reasons for this development.

But wait, there’s more! Some of the coal-fired power plants, which currently provide more than half of national electricity production, are old, making them prone to unplanned shutdowns that threaten our electricity supply. Coal, like oil, is also mainly imported from other countries, which makes local tariffs just as sensitive to changes in the global market.

In other words, we consumers have to worry not only about higher electricity costs, but also about a possible power shortage during the hottest months of the year.

These trends show us the need to urgently avoid the old normal defined by our reliance on fossil fuels. In times of crisis, our prolonged reliance on dirty coal and oil energy would result in more costs than just higher expenses.

Prices of staples such as rice, meat, fruits and vegetables would also increase. Workers who have welcomed face-to-face engagements again may have to rely on the work-from-home setup again. Families planning a summer vacation may need to rethink their budget. The sense of normalcy that was slowly returning to the daily lives of many Filipinos could once again be washed away.

On a larger scale, the pandemic has revealed just how precarious our energy sector is. The rigidity of our electricity networks and our heavy dependence on imported fuels have made our energy systems, and therefore our economy, vulnerable to drastic price increases.

Not to mention how the Philippines, one of the countries most vulnerable to man-made climate change, is ironically overly dependent on fossil fuels, the very cause of this crisis.

And who suffers most from the impacts of our leaders’ failure to liberate our nation from dirty energy? It is the poorest and most marginalized members of our society who would be further trapped in unjust living conditions like unaffordable fuels and goods, power outages and potential damage from extreme weather events.

As fuel prices reach record highs, governments seek solutions

We need real leadership

Our country should use this predicament of the summer with dirty energy as a basis to further develop our renewable energy resources and strengthen energy security and self-sufficiency. The next group of elected government officials must prioritize the development of cleaner and more sustainable energy sources like solar, wind and hydropower for a more flexible and user-friendly energy sector.

We also need to see our leaders commit to avoiding false solutions. This includes natural gas, which is currently being pushed by many as a transitional fuel as our country tries to phase out coal-fired power plants. Yet natural gas is a fossil fuel, like coal and oil, which currently has to be imported. Investing in this source of energy would only lead us to the same problems that we are currently experiencing.

The public was also advised to practice energy saving measures to reduce costs. Actions such as cycling, traveling using public modes of transportation, and reducing the use of electronic devices could lead to more savings and other health co-benefits for individuals and households.

That said, we consumers cannot always be expected to be the only ones to sacrifice due to the failure of our leaders to implement the right policies and solutions. At some point, our government must live up to its mandates and lead the implementation of an urgent and just transition away from the age of fossil fuels and avoid false solutions like nuclear power.

[OPINION]    Tale of the gang: Who are the greenest candidates?

We need leadership that initiates the improvement of public transport and active mobility infrastructure, instead of simply reacting to crises. We need leadership that would fully and effectively implement green laws, encourage divestment from fossil fuels and invest in real sustainable solutions instead of waiting over a decade to do so, as is happening. passed with the law on renewable energies.

We need leadership that takes a long-term view of energy security, climate resilience, and sustainable development instead of just providing billions in grants that are quick fixes at best. We need leadership that listens to the cries of the earth and the poor in the face of the demands of corporations, which still make billions during crises while everyone else loses.

More importantly, what we need is a break from rising prices, fossil fuels and an apology. Like a break from a toxic relationship, we’d be better off without them. – Rappler.com

John Leo is the Deputy Executive Director of Programs and Campaigns for Living Laudato Si’ Philippines, a member of the Withdraw from Coal network. He has been representing Philippine civil society at United Nations regional and global climate and environment conferences since 2017. He has been a climate and environment journalist since 2016.

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Connecticut Legislature Seeks Carbon-Free Electricity Goals by 2040 | national news https://waterky.org/connecticut-legislature-seeks-carbon-free-electricity-goals-by-2040-national-news/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 21:05:00 +0000 https://waterky.org/connecticut-legislature-seeks-carbon-free-electricity-goals-by-2040-national-news/ (The Center Square) — Governor Ned Lamont’s proposal to completely transition Connecticut’s electric grid from reliance on oil and gas by 2040 is back before state lawmakers. The bill would require the state to achieve a carbon-free electric supply by Jan. 1, 2040, the Hartford Courant reported. This is in addition to the emission reduction […]]]>

(The Center Square) — Governor Ned Lamont’s proposal to completely transition Connecticut’s electric grid from reliance on oil and gas by 2040 is back before state lawmakers.

The bill would require the state to achieve a carbon-free electric supply by Jan. 1, 2040, the Hartford Courant reported. This is in addition to the emission reduction targets currently in place.

Chris Herb, president of the Connecticut Energy Marketers Association, told The Center Square that the bill may have a laudable goal, but if rushed, it could lead to the kind of grid outages that ISO New England fought against. previously warned.

“To convert Connecticut’s electrical grid to all renewable energy sources, offshore wind is a popular option for policy makers,” Herb said. “It doesn’t take up land space. Offshore wind tends to be more stable and faster than onshore wind.”

Herb gives the example of one of the largest offshore wind power plants in the world: the Walney Extension wind farm off the coast of England. The UK wind farm has a capacity of 659 megawatts and spans around 56 square miles in the Irish Sea.

“The current nameplate capacity of Connecticut’s grid is 10,454 megawatts, so to replace that we would need some 15.9 Walney-sized wind farms, which have a lifespan of only 25 years,” he said. Herb. “With the higher cost of materials today and recent high inflation, let’s say the total cost to Connecticut would be $50 billion. This does not include the costs of decommissioning existing natural gas and nuclear power plants, nor the added cost of massive battery storage to store power when the wind isn’t blowing (as Germany experienced last year with its wind farms).”

An all-wind renewable electricity grid isn’t exactly practical in terms of space either. To put it into perspective, Herb said, if placed in Long Island Sound, that would mean one wind farm covering every square mile of Long Island Sound, from the New York border to Rhode Island. It would penetrate a few miles into the sound at its narrowest point to over 100 miles at its widest point.

“In reality, it’s likely that multiple renewables will be used, from solar to wind to hydro, nuclear and biofuels,” Herb said. “Without any coherent plan, it would be impossible to estimate the cost of such a complex mix of renewable energy sources. It is safe to say that it will cost tens of billions of dollars that taxpayers will pay the bill with higher electricity tariffs.”

Oil and gas, Herb said, are not part of what this bill envisions Connecticut’s electric future.

“It’s hard to imagine that we could avoid having blackouts without using gas and oil for many years,” Herb said. “It’s extremely risky and will have great economic and political consequences if (the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection and the Utilities Regulatory Authority) don’t exactly get it right.”

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RTL Today – Energy: What does Luxembourg’s electricity mix consist of? https://waterky.org/rtl-today-energy-what-does-luxembourgs-electricity-mix-consist-of/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 13:34:14 +0000 https://waterky.org/rtl-today-energy-what-does-luxembourgs-electricity-mix-consist-of/ Particularly in a context of political tensions and the risk of war in Eastern Europe, the question of the origin of the electricity consumed by Luxembourg households and businesses is of political interest. Luxembourg imports 70% of its electricity from Germany and 23% from France, but most of the electricity imported from France is injected […]]]>

Particularly in a context of political tensions and the risk of war in Eastern Europe, the question of the origin of the electricity consumed by Luxembourg households and businesses is of political interest.

Luxembourg imports 70% of its electricity from Germany and 23% from France, but most of the electricity imported from France is injected into the SOTEL industrial network, which supplies the ArcelorMittal steelworks.

What type of production does this electricity come from?

Looking at the entire European electricity market, 40% comes from non-renewable fossil fuels such as gas or coal, 35% from renewable energy sources such as wind, hydro or solar , and a quarter of European electricity production comes from nuclear energy.

According to the Luxembourg Regulatory Institute (ILR), the electricity mix sold by suppliers in Luxembourg is made up of 7% nuclear energy, 27% fossil energy and 65% renewable energy.

The ILR calculates the environmental impact and CO2 emissions based on the national electricity mix. CO2 emission certificates, which are traded throughout Europe, have seen their price explode, the price of CO2 having risen from €20 to €90 per tonne. This is also one of the reasons for the massive increase in the price of electricity for households over the past two years in Luxembourg (+10% in 2021).

All of these details on the electricity market and imports were provided by Energy Minister Claude Turmes in response to a parliamentary question from MP Fred Keup of the Alternative Démocratique Réformatrice (adr).

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Greens propose $40 billion takeover of power sector to phase out coal by 2030 https://waterky.org/greens-propose-40-billion-takeover-of-power-sector-to-phase-out-coal-by-2030/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 17:43:14 +0000 https://waterky.org/greens-propose-40-billion-takeover-of-power-sector-to-phase-out-coal-by-2030/ The accelerating decline of coal-fired power is triggering an overhaul of Australia’s electricity market, with the Greens proposing a $40 billion renationalisation of the sector. Key points: Greens policy would see Snowy Hydro become a not-for-profit, renewable-only producer and retailer The proposal would also eliminate coal and gas-fired power plants by 2030 and reverse a […]]]>

The accelerating decline of coal-fired power is triggering an overhaul of Australia’s electricity market, with the Greens proposing a $40 billion renationalisation of the sector.

Origin Energy announced on Thursday that it would close New South Wales’ largest coal-fired power station in 2025, seven years ahead of schedule, which followed AGL’s previous announcement that it was bringing forward the closure of two other coal-fired power stations.

The federal government is looking to the private sector for more investments in “distributable” energy, such as batteries, pumped hydro and gas to provide stability to the power grid when coal exits the system.

But the Greens have launched a bold policy to recast Snowy Hydro as a not-for-profit, renewables-only producer and retailer in the hope they hold the balance of power in the next parliament.

The Parliamentary Budget Officer estimates that it would cost $40 billion to build the infrastructure for the Greens’ proposal.(ABC News: Melissa Clarke)

“Our refitted Snowy Hydro would build 25 gigawatts of new renewables and storage, which is about the same as what the coal fleet is producing now,” Greens leader Adam Bandt told the ABC.

The Greens’ plan would also see:

  • All coal and gas power plants will be closed by 2030
  • Snowy Hydro sells electricity at cost to consumers
  • A cancellation of the federal government’s $600 million investment in the Kurri Kurri gas-fired power plant in the Hunter Valley

The Parliamentary Budget Office estimates that it would cost the Commonwealth $40 billion to build the electricity, transmission and storage facilities needed for the Greens’ proposal.

Small chance that the plan will become reality

The Greens’ proposal would effectively renationalize the electricity system, eliminating energy retailers and some generators from the market.

There is no appetite from the main parties to adopt a takeover of the national electricity market.

But the small party hopes to have some weight after the next federal election, if it manages to ensure the balance of powers in the Senate, or to share the balance of powers in the House of Representatives.

“It’s the kind of idea that could pass in the next parliament,” Bandt said.

“We are seeing that with coal-fired power plants shutting down as big companies decide they are unprofitable, workers and communities are being left behind,” Bandt said.

“It is therefore time for the government to intervene [up].”

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Tavanir provides solar electricity to 10,000 nomadic households https://waterky.org/tavanir-provides-solar-electricity-to-10000-nomadic-households/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 10:54:38 +0000 https://waterky.org/tavanir-provides-solar-electricity-to-10000-nomadic-households/ Tehran – Ali Chehel-Amirani, operator of Iran’s electricity generation, distribution and transmission company (known as Tavanir) for the rural electricity expansion program, says 10,000 nomadic households have been supplied with photovoltaic power plants (known as PV systems), the IRIB reported. “With the indigenization of knowledge for making solar panels in the country, so far 10,000 […]]]>

Tehran – Ali Chehel-Amirani, operator of Iran’s electricity generation, distribution and transmission company (known as Tavanir) for the rural electricity expansion program, says 10,000 nomadic households have been supplied with photovoltaic power plants (known as PV systems), the IRIB reported.

“With the indigenization of knowledge for making solar panels in the country, so far 10,000 nomadic households have been supplied with solar electricity,” Chehel-Amirani said.

The official noted that rural households currently account for more than 31 percent of the country’s total electricity consumers, saying, “The number of rural electricity subscribers has reached more than 21 million; to supply electricity to this number of subscribers, 25,000 kilometers of electricity distribution network have been built.

According to Chehel-Amirani, before the Islamic Revolution, only 4,367 villages had access to the national electricity grid, but with the victory of the Islamic Revolution, the access of rural areas to electricity increased 15 times, and currently, 57 966 villages are connected to the national electricity grid. The figure is expected to reach 58,000 by the end of the current financial year (March 20), the official said.

The official noted that currently more than 99.7 percent of rural areas in the country have access to the electricity grid and the rest will also join the grid in the next four years.

In October 2019, the Ministry of Energy announced the implementation of a program to supply nomadic households in the country with small mobile power plants.

Also in November 2020, the Iranian Planning and Budget Organization (PBO) signed a memorandum of understanding with the Imam Khomeini Relief Foundation and the Organization for the Mobilization of the Oppressed for the construction of 20,000 photovoltaic systems across the country.

The project was part of a comprehensive program in which in the first phase 20,000 PV systems would be built for rural and nomadic households and in subsequent phases the number will be increased to 100,000 stations.

According to data from the Ministry of Energy, renewable energy currently accounts for nearly 7% of the country’s total electricity generation capacity.

Of the country’s total renewable capacity, 44% is the share of solar power plants while the share of wind farms stands at 40% and small hydropower plants generate 13% of the total renewable capacity.

EF/MA

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Air turbine power system, a solution to electricity problems https://waterky.org/air-turbine-power-system-a-solution-to-electricity-problems/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 05:22:33 +0000 https://waterky.org/air-turbine-power-system-a-solution-to-electricity-problems/ February 11, 2022 BY PATRICK TOM A local power company, in its effort to solve the electricity problems in the country, introduces an air turbine power generation system. With the continued blackouts and blackouts that have affected businesses, industries, government establishments and general electricity users across the country, Air2Power Ltd believes they have the solution […]]]>

BY PATRICK TOM

A local power company, in its effort to solve the electricity problems in the country, introduces an air turbine power generation system.

With the continued blackouts and blackouts that have affected businesses, industries, government establishments and general electricity users across the country, Air2Power Ltd believes they have the solution to power generation and transmission problems. electricity in the country.

Managing Director and Chief Engineer of Air2Power Ltd, Thompson Benguma, said his company is in the process of setting up air turbine power generation systems which can generate and supply electricity and electricity. water 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year at the lowest possible cost anywhere in the country.

He said the system uses compressed air to generate electricity.

The system, unlike hydroelectric, solar or any other renewable energy system, can be established anywhere in the country in the shortest possible time and closer to where the electricity and water are. required, eliminating the need for high-transmission interprovincial transmission lines prone to sabotage. by disgruntled landowners and natural causes.

“PNG Power Ltd should consider removing national grids and establishing inter-connected district and provincial grids to address the problem of continuous power outages.”

He proposed this in response to the recent sabotage of a high transmission line in Chimbu which knocked out power to seven town centers in the Highlands region and some local communities.

Mr. Benguma said his company, together with a technology partner, is ready to provide a one-stop solution to the electricity problems in the country.

He said they can do this at no cost or at no cost to the government and PNG Power Ltd whose sole task is to pay for the electricity produced at the lowest possible cost of 0.40K per kWh.

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Gas is squeezed out of Australia’s power market as renewables kick in https://waterky.org/gas-is-squeezed-out-of-australias-power-market-as-renewables-kick-in/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 10:31:48 +0000 https://waterky.org/gas-is-squeezed-out-of-australias-power-market-as-renewables-kick-in/ Despite pandemic shutdowns and supply chain issues, households led a record increase in rooftop solar capacity last year. More than 3000MW were installed in 2021 and almost a third of Australian homes have solar panels, the highest rate in the world. Loading Although reliance on coal has continued to decline, it remains the primary source […]]]>

Despite pandemic shutdowns and supply chain issues, households led a record increase in rooftop solar capacity last year. More than 3000MW were installed in 2021 and almost a third of Australian homes have solar panels, the highest rate in the world.

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Although reliance on coal has continued to decline, it remains the primary source of energy in the NMS, accounting for 66% of electricity generation, a decline of 4.4% since 2020. Over the past five years , the share of coal in electricity generation fell by 15.3%.

Demand on the NEM has been constant for the past 15 years and hasn’t changed much during the pandemic because although consumers weren’t using electricity in offices, they were using it at home, said Tim Baxter, senior researcher at the Climate Council.

“The role of gas in the network will continue to decline over the next 10 years,” Baxter said. “This is where batteries and pumped hydro will help introduce more flexibility.”

The pumped hydro acts like a big battery. When there is excess power in the system, the energy is used to pump water to a storage area. When there is a demand for energy, water is released and used to generate electricity.

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Bruce Mountain, of the Victoria Energy Policy Centre, said the fall in gas consumption also showed that peak gas generators – activated only to supply the grid when demand increased – were being driven from the market.

“This was well known and expected by everyone in the energy sector,” Professor Mountain said.

The federal government has come under fire for its controversial proposal to build a $600 million gas-fired peaking plant at Kurri Kurri. When it was announced, Energy Security Board Chairman Kerry Schott said no one would build it from the private sector because “it doesn’t stack up.”

Federal Energy and Emissions Reduction Minister Angus Taylor said peaking or fast-start gas-fired power plants are needed to provide dispatchable power to fill energy supply gaps .

Victorian Minister for Environment and Climate Change Lily D’Ambrosio said her government was proud to have achieved Australia’s biggest-ever annual increase in renewable energy last year, attributing this to many multiple goals and legislated renewable energy projects such as the 300 megawatt Great Victorian Battery.

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The national electricity plan (part https://waterky.org/the-national-electricity-plan-part/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://waterky.org/the-national-electricity-plan-part/ It seems that the Pakistani government is skeptical about talks of an open market regime in the electricity sector. In the meantime, he lets the market players play. Government and other stakeholders may be skeptical because of what has happened in sugar, oil, flour and other markets. The government’s ambivalence is illustrated by its allowing […]]]>

It seems that the Pakistani government is skeptical about talks of an open market regime in the electricity sector. In the meantime, he lets the market players play. Government and other stakeholders may be skeptical because of what has happened in sugar, oil, flour and other markets.

The government’s ambivalence is illustrated by its allowing DISCOs to go to court against Nepra’s decision on the embezzlement charges. Wheeling is the first step towards an open market regime. Admittedly, Nepra, in its enthusiasm, opted for unreasonably low rolling charges of Rs1.5, which was a recipe for destroying the already struggling DISCOs. It also created the prospect of bringing the most inefficient power plants to market due to unduly low turnover rates – Rs1.5 against Rs5-6 per kWh, the normal DISCO rate.

Nepra ignored the legitimate inclusion of cross-subsidies and charges related to stranded assets. The NEP took note of this and proposed a reasonable framework. The question is: will Nepra accept it? After a bad experience, he can accept unless he wants to block the whole initiative of an open market under the CTBCM.

The NEP has almost ignored the issue of electricity storage. It should have included a significant number of clauses on the issue. We are talking about a share of renewable energy of 60 to 70%. Most countries with solar and wind power ambitions and goals are planning to set up electricity storage facilities. For example, the Philippines, with only 26,000 MW of installed capacity, plans to install one GW of storage and is already implementing a phased program in this regard.

Solar and wind remain quite competitive until they cross a certain threshold. Beyond this threshold, the needs for stability and capacity call for the addition of storage, which almost doubles the current tariff of 3-4 USc for solar and wind power, bringing it back to par with that of fossil fuels such as coal. Perhaps even then, solar and wind should be a preferable option as there is strong opposition to coal around the world.

There are signs that even Thar Coal may not be allowed to go beyond current projects. An example of this is Chinese announcements in international forums regarding non-funding of overseas coal projects. In this context, renewable energies as well as storage acquire an extraordinary importance. The NEP should therefore fill in this gas and release more than it forecast in its report.

The NEP planners may have overstepped their bounds. They talk about the integrated energy plan (IEP). Energy is not just electricity. There are other sectors such as transport, industry and agriculture which use various types of energy and not just electricity which requires gas and oil and this may be the engine to push them in the integrated energy plan.

A multidisciplinary body such as the Town Planning Commission (CP) can take charge of this mission of the IEP. The PC failed to deliver in this regard, which pushed them to the IEP proposal. There is no guarantee that the Power Planning and Monitoring Company (PPMC) would succeed despite the lack of institutional context. He offered to move the IEP cell to the PPMC – although it doesn’t appear to be allowed.

The electricity division or PPMC has a lot to integrate in the field of the electricity sector – generation, transmission and distribution. The question of transmission has often been forgotten because we notice the lack of corresponding transmission capacity. Distribution has always remained an activity in its own right.

Universal access and rural electrification have been on the agenda for a long time. It was difficult and uneconomical to extend the large-scale network to include less populated rural areas. Fortunately, solar, wind, small hydro and other renewable energies have opened up many possibilities. The NEP has addressed this subject. Currently, in many rural areas, people use these resources in cooperative self-help in an unorganized way.

Electric cooperatives are very successful in the United States. Under cooperative programs, at least operation, maintenance and bill collection can be arranged even if provincial governments or utilities perform the initial installations. Bills can be collected by residents in legal cooperation with a party deposited in the investor’s account. The lack of supervision has prevented rural areas from accessing many infrastructures. The government could also consider extending the cooperative movement to other sectors as well.

A commendable aspect of the NEP is the provision for the indigenization of fuel. It provided for the conversion of imported coal-fired power stations to local Thar coal. It can be a difficult task but totally possible. Feasibility studies should be undertaken in this regard. Three imported coal plants was initially a mistake; one or two would have sufficed to make up the shortfall for the installation of gasworks.

We are talking dangerously about the closure of these factories as part of a compensation plan. In this context, the conversion to coal of the Thar is a good idea. We are facing a huge current account deficit problem. The increase in exports is a long-term problem. Immediate options are available to reduce energy imports through indigenization. The exploitation of the Thar coal has almost been entrusted to a single company. More players should come into coal mining. Pakistan has virtually no other energy resources and its gas supply is already dwindling.

It should be pointed out in international forums that Pakistan has a low carbon front and does not have much choice. India has successfully delayed coal phase-out targets beyond the year 2050. What harm would 25,000 MW of Thar coal capacity do in the context of over 200,000 MW of power plant capacity in the coal in our neighborhood?

Talking about hydrogen is premature for a plan whose deadline is the year 2024. Moreover, it is an oil division problem, if at all. I’m a strong proponent of hydrogen as a long-term option. At this stage, research and development can be initiated in this regard. We would have liked that the NEP had also provided for the local manufacture of solar equipment.

The NEP is a welcome initiative. It will incorporate essential activities that are merely suggestions, provide a useful document for stakeholders, and generate a common goal around which efforts can be organized. Hopefully it won’t stay as a wrapped document.

The plan can be improved and adjusted; issues raised in the article can also be considered. The elimination of circular debt, inefficiencies and leakages and the business of modernization and innovation, and expansion to meet required demand leading to greater utility and consumer satisfaction and reduction in cost supplies are the call of the hour. It can be done. The NEP can be an excellent tool to achieve these noble goals. It should be widely disseminated to get input from stakeholders.

Concluded

The author is a former member of Energy Planning

Commission and author of ‘Pakistan’s Energy Issues:

Successes and challenges”.

He can be reached at: akhtarali1949@gmail.com

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Solar’s new revenue stream offering alternative clean electricity to power cryptocurrency mining may work in the future; Solar Integrated Roofing Corp. (OTC PINK: SIRC) expands its national solar footprint https://waterky.org/solars-new-revenue-stream-offering-alternative-clean-electricity-to-power-cryptocurrency-mining-may-work-in-the-future-solar-integrated-roofing-corp-otc-pink-sirc-expands-its-national-solar-fo/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 13:33:54 +0000 https://waterky.org/solars-new-revenue-stream-offering-alternative-clean-electricity-to-power-cryptocurrency-mining-may-work-in-the-future-solar-integrated-roofing-corp-otc-pink-sirc-expands-its-national-solar-fo/ Ideally, solar-generated electricity could power bitcoin mining in the future. It would be the perfect marriage of clean solar electricity powering bitcoin mining internationally. The concept sounds great, but an analysis of this “ideal marriage” indicates that it doesn’t work today because the large energy requirements of bitcoin miners make it inefficient. If successful in […]]]>

Ideally, solar-generated electricity could power bitcoin mining in the future. It would be the perfect marriage of clean solar electricity powering bitcoin mining internationally. The concept sounds great, but an analysis of this “ideal marriage” indicates that it doesn’t work today because the large energy requirements of bitcoin miners make it inefficient. If successful in the future, it would represent a lucrative new revenue stream for solar installers such as Solar Integrated Roofing Corp. (ROSE OTC: SIRC).

stockmarketpress.com offers specialized coverage of related stocks in the solar energy, roofing, electric vehicle charging stations and battery charging energy industry, such as Solar Integrated Roofing Corp. (PINK OTC: SIRC), Sunrun, Inc. (NASDAQ: RUN)Blink Charging Co. (NASDAQ: BLNK)Tesla, Inc. (NASDAQ: TSLA), GM (NYSE:GM), Charging point (NYSE: CHPT)EVgo (NASDAQ: EVGO), SolarEdge Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: SEDG), Premier Solar, Inc. (NASDAQ: FSLR), Sun Power (NASDAQ: SPWR), Gibraltar Industries, Inc. (NASDAQ: ROCK), Spartan Acquisition Corp. II (NYSE: SPRQ). and Canadian Solar Inc. (NASDAQ: CSIQ).

Solar’s New Revenue Stream Providing Clean Alternative Electricity to Power Ma Cryptocurrency Mining Works in the Future; Solar Integrated Roofing Corp. (PINK OTC: SIRC) expands its national footprint in solar

“Some say solar power is the future of cryptocurrency mining, but that can be disputed as some countries are climatically colder than others,” an analysis reveals.

“It takes about 6,000 watts of solar panels to run a Bitcoin mining rig with multiple GPUs during the day, while also charging batteries to mine at night,” he concludes.

So miners looking to go green and cut central grid costs are turning to other alternative energies – from natural gas to even hydroelectric power. Solar would appear to be part of the alternative energy mix powering future bitcoin mining facilities. Only the future will tell. Solar’s new revenue stream offering clean alternative electricity to power cryptocurrency mining may work in the future; Solar Integrated Roofing Corp. (PINK OTC: SIRC) expands its national footprint in solar.

The important news is that cryptocurrency mining matters as Bitcoin and other mining results are increasingly accepted by central banks as legitimate sources of currency. More localized governments are actually paying their employees with cryptocurrency – and offering year-end bonuses on valuation gains made in digital currency. This is already the case in Miami.

Solar can play a role in removing the biggest Achilles heel of bitcoin mining – the huge need for energy. Access to the central power grid means that earnings from Bitcoin and other cryptocurrency coins face a headwind of large and uncontrolled mining spending.

Ideally, solar power could play a key role in this protocol – but its power, even with rechargeable solar batteries – is spotty and inefficient to store against heavy use.

“Ultimately, cryptocurrency mining will have to start exploring and using renewable energy intensively because that will take one of the thorns in the flesh of the regulator, eventually allowing them to view cryptocurrencies like bitcoin as legal tender”, concludes the analysis.

A new report from Wood Mackenzie noted that Solar could ride out headwinds if BBB goes through in its current form. Solar deployments would triple by 2026 and help offset an additional 83 million tonnes of carbon. BBB is dead, but may go into separate “pieces” later.

Headwinds to BBB segments include shipping deferrals and prices, according to the report. While solar component prices fell 12% between Q1 2019 and Q1 2021, the report says price spikes over the past six months have wiped out all of these savings over this two-year period. . Solar’s new revenue stream offering clean alternative electricity to power cryptocurrency mining may work in the future; Solar Integrated Roofing Corp. (PINK OTC: SIRC) expands its national footprint in solar.

Michelle Davis, principal analyst at Wood Mackenzie and lead author of the new report, says, “Federal BBB tax credits would help drive solar sales and deployments in nascent states. For example, Texas would add 7 GW of additional solar capacity over baseline forecasts by 2026, reaching 44 GW of cumulative capacity.

Another report sees rooftop solar and other renewable energy sources growing over the next three years to generate at least 30% of the country’s capacity. New solar panel technologies and mid-January solar incentive grants are helping to spur the growth of solar installations and more renewable energy, the ENRCalifornia website recently reported. These positive moves are tailwinds for solar installers, such as Solar Integrated Roofing Corp.(PINK OTC: SIRC). Today, renewable energy generates only 25% of the total capacity of the United States.

The decision within three years to generate 30% of the country’s electricity capacity – against only 25% today – needs a new impetus thanks to new financing and technologies. This includes incentive rewards for new rooftop and small-scale solar projects.

In addition, new technologies can reduce installation costs.

Solar power and other renewables generate a larger percentage of the country’s capacity needs. According to the “Bring Me The News” website, electricity rates have jumped about 30% over the past 10 years in some states. This makes solar not only a conservation purchase, but also an energy efficient purchase. For bitcoin miners, this makes any alternative energy source – solar, hydroelectric, wind – attractive as a way to offset significantly higher electricity rates.

Solar energy and roofing remain SIRC’s main activities. Its workaround may mean that potential buyers of solar systems can raise the price with renewable solar batteries, but in the long run beat higher energy costs – while using rooftop solar to fight carbon.

Solar’s new revenue stream offering clean alternative electricity to power cryptocurrency mining may work in the future; Solar Integrated Roofing Corp. (PINK OTC: SIRC) expands its national footprint in solar

Learn more about SIRC at https://www.solarintegratedroofing.com/corporate-governance/leadership/.

Source: Stock market press

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